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Review: Lars and the Real Girl

There comes a point in every man’s life when he realizes it’s finally time to grow up. There comes a time when he realizes it’s time to stop running, stop hiding, and stop avoiding careers, responsibilities, and commitments. There comes a time in every man’s life when he realizes it’s time to buy a life-size, anatomically correct … doll.

Lars (Ryan Gosling) is a man who likes to be left alone. He’s friendly and people like him, but he just wants to be left alone. His sister-in-law won’t have it, she makes it her personal mission to crack him open and integrate him into modern society. Lars does what any man would do in such a situation, he turns to the internet.

Lars and the Real Girl is a film about family. Essentially, this film is one giant Bar Mitzvah, as an entire town comes together to help Lars as he transitions to adulthood. It’s clever, well-acted, and has a heart. As far as I’m concerned, Juno robbed Lars of it’s best screenplay Oscar, and I loved Juno. In it’s own dark, twisted way, Lars and the Real Girl is about a village that comes together to raise a child; a child coming of age; a child who discovers that as scary as real life is, it is a lot more fun than any childhood fantasy.

– 1,247 arbitrary stars

  • just saw Lars and the Real Girl, Gosling did a great job playing out his character’s psychological transition from totally dysfunctional to somewhat functional; it was nice of them to leave out the predictable small-town drama as well

  • just saw Lars and the Real Girl, Gosling did a great job playing out his character’s psychological transition from totally dysfunctional to somewhat functional; it was nice of them to leave out the predictable small-town drama as well